Federally Recognized Tribes / First Nations with historical ties to TENNESSEE

Federally Recognized Tribes - First Nations with historical ties to TENNESSEE


NOTE: These are tribes/nations that must be contacted in the NAGPRA and NHPA Section 106 process:
"Only direct interaction with all of the appropriate representatives
satisfies Federally mandated consultation requirements
."

The following list is maintained by
the TN Indian Affairs Advisory Council.
For any additions or changes to this list,
contact tom kunesh / 423. 624.3380




Historical (Colonial-period) Tribes of Tennessee [1540 - ]
"traditional" english tribal name
      (historical/european period)

  1. Cherokee

  2. Muscogee (Creek)

  3. Chickasaw

  4. Choctaw

  5. Shawnee

  6. Yuchi

  7. Seneca

"The tribal identities of the 16th and 17th century occupants of Tennessee are disputed. By the 18th century, the only native peoples living permanently in Tennessee were the Cherokee. The Chickasaw controlled western Tennessee, but there is no archaeological or historical evidence that they used the area for more than hunting. The Shawnee and Creek briefly occupied small areas in the state, but little archaeological evidence has been found." - UTK McClung Museum

Seneca info: Myths of the Cherokee, by James Mooney: the Iroquois Wars, Hiadeoni, The Seneca, Escape Of The Seneca Boys, The Seneca Peacemaker.

current nations' name (grouped)
  1. Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma
  2. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
  3. United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma

  4. Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
  5. Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
  6. Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi

  7. Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma
  8. Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma
  9. Loyal Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

  10. Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma
  11. Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma
  12. Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma
  13. Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma

  14. Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas
  15. Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana
  16. Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama

  17. Yuchi Tribe of Oklahoma

  18. Seneca Nation of New York
  19. Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma
Pre-Historical Tribes of Tennessee

  • At least 90% of Tennessee's known human archaeological "resources" are prehistoric and culturally unidentifiable, ie, existing tribes -- all displaced from Tennessee in the 1830s -- have no known connection to pre-Mississippian remains. ("By the 18th century, the only native peoples living permanently in Tennessee were the Cherokee." *) Given known migration patterns and the commonality of artifacts with geographically distant tribes, the tribes of the Mississippian Period (800 - 1600 CE) and "historic" (european) period (1600 - present) which are most closely associated with this territory today are probably -not- the descendants of the indigenous people who lived here in the Paleo (40,000 - 10,000 BCE), Archaic (10,000 - 1000 BCE) and Woodland (1,000 BCE - 800 CE) periods. (See the University of Tennessee at Knoxville's McClung Museum's archaeology website for more info.)

  • Given the continued presence of Siouan language tribes (federally-recognized) in the Southeastern United States, including the Catawba Indian Tribe of South Carolina, the Saponi and Tutelo of Virginia and North Carolina, and the (Tunica-) Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana, possibly the Yuchi, and the now extinct Ofo tribe, both of the Lower Mississippi Valley, and assuming the migration of Native Americans from South to North, given the strong supporting data of artifacts, linguistics and recent genetic data (see Charles Hudson, The Southeastern Indians (U of TN 1976) pp 56, 62, 80, 82, 88, 94-95, 510, 514), it is reasonable to believe that the Northern Siouan language tribes -- the Hochunk, Dakota, Lakota, Nakota, Crow, Mandan and Hidatsa, Ponca, Iowa, Missouri and Oto -- had lived in and passed through the Tennessee area in pre-colonial times, ie, prior to the year 1400. This would place the ancestors of these related Siouan-language tribes in the Southeastern United States and would argue their inclusion among the culturally-affiliated tribes of Tennessee.
    (Note: No historical data or artifacts support the hypothesis that Southeastern tribes, with the exception of the Cherokee, emigrated from the North to the South, or West to East, in keeping with the twentieth-century Bering-Strait theory. The first record of "Sioux" migration dates from the French-Canadian explorers and Jesuits in 1640, in Minnesota, moving east to west and north to south. The Hochunk ("Winnebago") of Wisconsin are considered the "old speakers" of Siouan -- ""people of the parent speech" referring to their role as "grandfathers," the original people from which other Siouan-speaking tribes sprang"*. The Lakota term for wolf, shunk-manitu, with its borrowing of the Anishinabe term 'manitu'/sacred, suggests a later introduction of the northern wolf into the vocabulary of a south-to-north travelling Siouan people.)

    current siouan-language nations' name (grouped)


    1. Catawba Indian Nation (aka Catawba Tribe of South Carolina)
    2. Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana
    3. Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma

    4. Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe of South Dakota
    5. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe of the Lower Brule Reservation, South Dakota
    6. Lower Sioux Indian Community of Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the Lower Sioux Reservation in Minnesota
    7. Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota
    8. Prairie Island Indian Community of Minnesota Mdewakanton Sioux Indians of the Prairie Island Reservation, Minnesota
    9. Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota
    10. Santee Sioux Tribe of the Santee Reservation of Nebraska
    11. Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community of Minnesota (Prior Lake)
    12. Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe of the Lake Traverse Reservation, South Dakota
    13. Spirit Lake Tribe, North Dakota (formerly known as the Devils Lake Sioux Tribe)
    14. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota
    15. Upper Sioux Indian Community of the Upper Sioux Reservation, Minnesota
    16. Yankton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota

    17. Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin (formerly known as the Wisconsin Winnebago Tribe)
    18. Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska

    19. Ponca Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma
    20. Ponca Tribe of Nebraska
    21. Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota

Contacts and Addresses of Tribes and Nations
Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma

Principal Chief
Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma
P.O. Box 948
Tahlequah OK 74465

NAGPRA Contact:
Richard L. Allen
Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma
PO Box 948
Tahlequah OK 74465

Eastern Band of Cherokee

Principal Chief
Eastern Band of Cherokee
P.O. Box 455
Cherokee NC 28719

NAGPRA Contact:
Kathy McCoy
Cultural Resource Development
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians
PO Box 455
Cherokee NC 28719

United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma

Chief
United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians
P.O. Box 189
Parkhill OK 74451
918-431-1818
918-431-1873

NAGPRA Contact:
Ms. Emma Sue Holland
United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indian
PO Box 746
Tahlequah OK 74465

Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma

Governer
Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma
P.O. Box 1548
Ada OK 74821-1548
580/ 436-2603

Kirk Perry
Division of Heritage Preservation
Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma
P.O. Box 1548
Ada OK 74821-1548
580/ 436-2603
580/ 332-8478

Choctaw Tribe of Oklahoma

Chief
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
Drawer 1210
Durant OK 74702
580-924-8280
580-924-1150
Mississippi Band of Choctaw

Chief
Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians
P.O. Box 6010, Choctaw Branch
Philadelphia MS 39350
601-650-1500
601-656-1992
Muscogee (Creek) Tribe of Oklahoma

Principal Chief
Muscogee (Creek) Nation
P.O Box 580
Okmulgee OK 74447
918-756-8700
918-756-2911
Thlopthlocco Tribal Town (Creek)

Mekko (Town King)
Thlopthlocco Tribal Town
PO Box 188, Okemah OK 74859
918-623-2620
918-623-0419
Kialegee Tribal Town (Creek)

Mekko (Town King)
Kialegee Tribal Town
PO Box 332, Wetumka OK 74883
405-452-3262
405-452-3413
Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas

Tribal Administrator
Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas
Route 3 Box 640, Livingston TX 77351
936-563-1100
Alabama Quassarte Tribal Town (Creek)

Chief
Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town
P.O. Box 187, Wetumka OK 74883
405-452-3987
405-452-3968
Poarch Band of Creek Indians

Poarch Band of Creek Indians
5811 Jack Springs Road
Atmore AL 36502
251-368-9136
251-368-1026
Yuchi Tribe of Oklahoma
P.O. Box 1990
Sapulpa, Oklahoma 74087
918/ 227-3898
Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

Governer
Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma
2925 S. Gordon Cooper Drive
Shawnee OK 74801-9381
T: (405) 275-4030

NAGPRA Tribal Representative
Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma
2925 S. Gordon Cooper Drive
Shawnee OK 74801-9381
T: (800) 256-3341
Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma
P.O. Box 350
Seneca MO 64865
T: (918) 666-2435

Loyal Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

Shawnee Tribe
P.O. Box 189
Miami OK 74355
918-542-2441
918-542-2922

Tennessee State-Recognized Tribes and Nations

none

State-wide Native American Organizations in Tennessee

Tennessee Commission of Indian Affairs
Ms Van Lynch, chairperson
Dyer TN 38330
www.state.tn.us/environment/tcia

Advisory Council on Tennessee Indian Affairs
David Teat, chairperson
Antioch TN 37013
www.actia.org

Tennessee Native American Convention
John Smith, chairperson
Memphis TN 38111
www.tnnac.org

updated july 2007


The National Park Service's Native American Consultation Database
is a useful resource. Unfortunately it tends to be a little out of date and sometimes the form is dysfunctional, but still provides valuable information for contacts. It can be accessed at: http://web.cast.uark.edu/other/nps/nacd/

  • list of federally-recognized tribes in 2000
  • National Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Program: www.cr.nps.gov/nagpra/
  • National Association of Tribal Historic Preservation Officers (NATHPO): www.nathpo.org/




  • TNCIA | TNNAC
    document URL: http://www.tncia.org/tn-fed-tribes.html
    ©Copyrighted 2002 by the Tennessee Indian Affairs Advisory Council. All Rights Reserved. Last Updated on 29 july 2002.

    If you have any questions, contact tom kunesh / 423. 624.3380